Sports

Fifty years later, the chaos of Cleveland’s 10-Cent Beer Night still shocks
Sports

Fifty years later, the chaos of Cleveland’s 10-Cent Beer Night still shocks

There were streakers, kissers and wannabe prize fighters. There were arrests, threats and flying chairs. There were bruises, there was blood and there was beer. So, so much beer. There was plenty of blame to pass around: the fans, the umpires, the team officials, the managers, local broadcasters and radio hosts. Oh, and according to one Cleveland resident, the real instigator causing that evening’s mayhem? The moon. And that’s not a reference to the fans who yanked down their pants and showed Rangers players their backsides. Fifty years ago, chaos descended upon Municipal Stadium on 10-Cent Beer Night. Now, the infamous events of June 4, 1974, when an alcohol-fueled crowd spilled onto the field, confronted players and forced a forfeit, are often viewed in a light-hearted manner, ...
A former hockey agent seeks answers about CTE before it’s too late
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A former hockey agent seeks answers about CTE before it’s too late

Memory, today and five years ago Chris Nilan is a quintessential Bostonian of a certain era and demographic, the type they make movies about: a tough, working-class hockey player of Irish descent, hundreds, if not thousands, of local kids wished they were just like him. He was born February 9, 1958, at Faulkner Hospital in West Roxbury, Massachusetts, the son of Henry and Leslie Nilan, a hard-working blue-collar couple who raised their four children in a strict household. Chris was still fighting his way as a child and soon discovered that he was a capable and fearless fighter. Often, he said, he stood up for others. Later, he mingled with groups of kids and young adults on the streets and in bars of Boston. He met Karen Stanley at Northeastern University and they fell in love. When ...
How Tim Flannery, the Giants coach, went back to writing songs
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How Tim Flannery, the Giants coach, went back to writing songs

“Like having to choose between air and water,” he said. “I have to have both.” Although Flannery grew up primarily in Anaheim, California, his family came from the hills of Kentucky. His uncle, Hal Smith, was a catcher who hit a three-run homer for Pittsburgh in the eighth inning of Game 7 of the 1960 World Series. If the Pirates' bullpen had been leading 9-7, Smith would have been a hero . Instead, the Yankees tied the game and Pittsburgh's Bill Mazeroski won the game and earned immortality. Smith, who played for 10 seasons, regularly took a Gibson J35 guitar with him on the road. When Flannery signed professionally at 19, he followed suit. Flannery's first manager, Roger Craig, told him to focus on baseball rather than playing the guitar, but the instrument remained his constant com...
How the Reds’ Joey Votto became a social media star
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How the Reds’ Joey Votto became a social media star

The outburst, which Votto and Jim Day, the reporter on the sidelines of the Reds broadcasts, had been reenacting for weeks – even on the team plane, which confused quite a few members of the Reds staff – has gone viral: one of the funniest characters of baseball had acted again. Votto, 40, who didn't embrace social media until March 2020, now regularly posts content to an audience of more than 300,000 followers on Instagram and X, formerly known as Twitter. Like the attack on Russo, Votto's posts are carefully conceived and executed. Last winter, she posed in a flamboyant designer outfit - puffer jacket, furry tracksuit, expensive sunglasses, all purchased for the occasion - before playing in a chess tournament in Toronto. In June, shortly before returning from shoulder surgery, he debu...
Jimmy Aggrey was a victim of the Chelsea racism scandal – now he wants to talk
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Jimmy Aggrey was a victim of the Chelsea racism scandal – now he wants to talk

Related media - Associated media e was the tallest player. Even at the age of 16, Jimmy Aggrey stood well over six feet. The big lads went at the back. Line up and smile for the camera, please. Chelsea liked him. They thought he had a good chance of making it. For such a tall kid, Aggrey had quick, skilful feet. His future was bright at a time, in 1995, when Chelsea were re-establishing themselves among the most glamorous football clubs in England. “When I joined Chelsea, Glenn Hoddle was the first-team manager,” says Aggrey. “Ruud Gullit arrived later. The place was full of superstars: Gianfranco Zola, Frank Leboeuf, Roberto Di Matteo. So I can understand why many people might think it’s a great photograph. They should have been the greatest times of my life.” Aggrey was in...